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10 Popular Cartoons that were banned in these countries for some reasons

Cartoons have always been entertaining, thrilling and exciting. Cartoon characters have captured the hearts of children, adults. Even today, countless people are watching cartoons.

We used to think it amusing and innocent, but some cartoons have been prohibited in some countries because they are too contentious. If you’re not familiar with it, keep reading.

An episode of Peppa Pig was banned throughout Australia:

Peppa Pig was banned in Australia only because of an episode in which the characters attempted to make friends with spiders and bugs, which was extremely dangerous in a country like Australia, which is home to 10,000 species of spiders (some of which are pretty harmful). As a result, it was restricted.

Episodes of SpongeBob SquarePants were banned in more than 120 countries:

For displaying violence and using bad language in SpongeBob SquarePants, the cartoon was banned in 120 nations, including the United States, Europe, China, Russia, and Australia. Squidward considers suicide in an episode that was taken off the air.

Few episodes of Tom and Jerry were taken off across the world:

10 Popular Cartoons that were banned in these countries for some reasons

In several locations, the popular cartoon Tom and Jerry was also banned due to sequences in which the characters were seen smoking, drinking, and doing activities that were not appropriate for children.

An episode from the Tiny Toon Adventures was banned throughout the world:

The cartoons were seen attempting to steal a beer bottle in one episode titled “One Beer,” however these alcohol-related scenes are not suitable for youngsters, so the programme was removed from the air.

Shrek 2 was banned in Israel:

The cartoon was restricted in Israel because it mocked the human body. The authors substituted it with a notable Israeli singer known for his high voice during dubbing. The humour irritated musician David D’Or, who went on to sue the cartoon’s creators.

Shin Chan was banned in India:

10 Popular Cartoons that were banned in these countries for some reasons

Shinhan was launched in India in 2006, however, it was banned in 2008 due to Shinhan’s behavior towards girls and disrupting other people, which is not appropriate for kids.

China banned the popular cartoon show Winnie The Pooh:

After memes linking the animation to Chinese President Xi Jinping circulated on the internet in 2017, this cartoon went off. As a result of the government’s opposition to any type of ridicule of the leader, pooh photographs were also restricted on the internet.

One of the Pokemon episodes was banned on TV in Turkey, Japan, and the Arab League:

Japan, Turkey, as well as the Arab League, banned this cartoon. There was an explosion with intense blue and red flashes at a frequency of 12 Hz in one of the episodes.

Many children worry about their health, and some have even lost consciousness due to partial vision loss. It was also claimed that 600 kids were taken to a hospital. The whole incident got known as ‘Pokemon Shock’ later on.

Kenya and many middle east countries banned Steven Universe:

Steven Universe was prohibited by Kenya’s Film Ratings System in 2017 since it was “pro-homosexual.” In a statement, KFCB supported the decision, arguing that the broadcasts “are intended to introduce children to aberrant behavior.”

Cow and Chicken banned in India:

In India, the show was barred because it showed cows as perpetrators of assault. Cows are respected in the country. The cartoon was considered insulting. Along with it, there were a few offensive jokes and inappropriate comments that were inappropriate.

Written by TheYouth Staff

TheYouth is India's number one youth oriented media. This is the staff of editors.

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