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India records Most Number of Babies born on New Year, ranks No.1 on the list

Yes, it was a happy new year for many lovely couples in India. India celebrated 2019 with around 70,000 newborn babies which is the highest globally as reported by UNICEF.

As per the reports from PTI, 3,95,000 babies were expected to announce its arrival all around the world. Out of these 18% births were in India. It may be noted that half of the total number of births were expected to happen in 8 countries including the likes of India, China, Pakistan, United States and Bangladesh.

India was expected to give 69,944 births, followed by China (44,940), Nigeria (25,685), Pakistan (15,112), Indonesia (13,256), US (11,086), The Democratic Republic of Congo (10,053) and Bangladesh (8,428), as per the reports.

As far as Sydney is concerned it is 168 newborns while Tokyo and Beijing gave birth to 310 and 605 babies. Dr Yasmin Ali Haque, UNICEF India Representative had said that this New Year everyone should have an aim to fulfil every right of every girl and boy, laying the first stone with the right to survive.

Fiji, located in South Pacific was the first country to give birth to new babies. On the contrary, the U.S will be the last one.

UNICEF reported that around 69,000 babies are born every passing day. It may be noted that the day of birth is the dangerous day for both the mother and the newborn as nearly half of the maternal deaths and 40% of the newborn deaths occur on the day of birth only.

Roughly, 386,000 babies were born on January 01, 2018. In the previous year, Vivek was the first baby to announce his arrival in India to parents Yashodha and Arvind.

Written by Chaithanya G

Hailing from Chennai, Chaithanya G is the Managing Director of TheYouth. He has dedicated his whole life to reading and writing.

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